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Bartholin's original Latin, with current translation

1654 - Original Latin:

Flamma ex ventriculo.

        Flammam in ventriculo ex nimio spiritus vini haustu excitari, nec à ratione, nec experientiâ alienum. Lugduni ad confluentem Araris & Rhodani, quum mulieris cujusdam cadaver causam mortis investigaturi Medici reser assent, ingens ex ventriculo prorupit flamma, universum ventriculi ambitum occupans, mox tamen extincta. Ad 'Renatum Moraeum' summum Scholae Parisiensis decus, perscripta fuit historia, ex cujus magni Viri ore hanc habeo. Causa flamme credebatur spiritus vini largius à muliere istâ sorptus, vel calidior theriaces aqua, quàm Medicis suadentibus aegra sumpserat.

Current translation:

Flame from the stomach.

        Many people have noted that a flame can be excited from the stomach by an excess of alcohol. In Lyons, France, at the confluence of the Rhone and the Saone rivers, when the cause of death of a certain woman was being investigated, it was found that a huge fire had broken out within her stomach which occupied the entire area of the cavity, and quickly extinguished. This was written down by Renato Moraeum, of the highest honors of the School of Paris, and I [Bartholin] have this report straight from the great man himself. The cause of the fire was believed to either be an excess of wine or an excess of 'theriaces' [a medicine meant to battle poison or poisonous bites] that she may have been taking despite doctors' advice against it.

 
1657 - Original Latin:
 
Mors & flamma ex vino adusto.
...
Cum in Galliis versarer Lugduni ad confluentem Araris & Rhodani mulieris cujusdam cadaver sive nimio sp. Vini haustu, sive calidiore Theriaces aqua extincta, rationem mortis investigaturi Medici aparuerunt, & ingentem ex ventriculo flammam erumpentem observarunt, sed brevi interposita mora extinctam, narrante mihi Renato Могao Medico Parisiense, Professore Regio meritissimo, & Magno amico nostro.
 
Current Translation:

Death of the wine and flame burns.

...

I tossed in Lyon at the confluence of the Rhone and Saone in France with the dead body of a woman of a certain spirit or excessive. And drink wine or warm water Theriaces extinct, physicians appeared to begin investigating the nature of death, and huge flames bursting out of the stomach observed, but short pause extinct, the doctor told me Renato Могao Paris, Regius Professor deserved, and a great friend of ours.

Have a better translation? Please let me know!