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NOTES

  1. Text from the Stubblefield monument on the campus of the Murray State College in Murray, Kentucky, placed in 1930. It reads thus:
    HERE IN 1902
    NATHAN B. STUBBLEFIELD
    1860 - 1928
    INVENTOR OF RADIO -- BROADCAST AND
    RECEIVED THE HUMAN VOICE BY WIRELESS.
    HE MADE EXPERIMENTS 10 YEARS EARLIER.
    HIS HOME WAS 100 FEET WEST.
  2. Frank Edwards’ book, Stranger Than Science, gives the date of the Murray demonstration as 1892 and the date of Stubblefield’s death as 1929. These are likely incorrect for the simple reason that the dates given on the memorial mentioned above is 1902 for the Murray demonstration and 1928 for his death, and this agrees with my other sources. Perhaps Edwards or his source for the story confused the date of the Murray demonstration for the date of Stubblefield’s 1892 demonstration to Rainey T. Wells. Edwards also sets the date of the demonstration for the Post Dispatch reporter as January 10, 1902.
            Let me also note that Edwards tries to add to the sense of mystery surrounding Stubblefield’s device by stating that Stubblefield’s patents don’t make sense to those who examine them, and that the inventors’ equipment and records were missing from the scene of his death (which he neglects to mention was caused by starvation), thus implying Stubblefield was killed by someone to get these items.
  3. Edward Lambert in a 1970 article in TV Guide states that Stubblefield had put in “two decades worth of effort” in developing his wireless telephone before his 1902 demonstration.